When seeking U.S. Citizenship, you must go through a naturalization interview. Most questions are familiar since they resemble those previously answered in your U.S. Citizenship application. While some questions may seem insignificant, USCIS officers aren't always interested in the answers but how those answers are given. If you want to prepare adequately, here are some of the most asked questions for U.S. Citizenship.

Greetings Questions

Expect to be asked how you are, how you are doing and/or how you are feeling.

Oath Questions

USCIS officers also ask applicants if they understand the Oath of allegiance and if they promise to be truthful.

Basic Personal Information Questions

You will also be asked your name, place of birth, Date of Birth, race, ethnicity, and related questions.

Physical Attribute Questions

USCIS officers are also interested in knowing how tall you are, your eye color, and other subjects related to your physical attributes.

Family History Questions

U.S. Citizenship applicants are also asked family history questions that include, but aren't limited to parent's name, parent's U.S. Citizenship, country of birth, marriage history, no. Of children, etc.

Relationship History Questions

U.S. immigration is also interested in knowing your relationship history from your marital status to spouse's/partner's name, D.O.B., employment status, no of past marriages, and country of birth.

Immigration Status Questions

The USCIS is also interested in knowing your immigration status i.e., your Citizenship, if you have permanent residence, and how long you've had permanent Citizenship.

Travel History Questions

You will also be asked the number of countries you've visited, the countries you've visited, when you entered the U.S., last trip outside America, reasons for traveling abroad, and trips you've made recently.

Residential History Questions

You should be ready to give information on your current residence, how long you've lived there, and past residences.

Education & Employment History Questions

Immigration is also interested in knowing how educated you are, where you went to school, college, and university, your current job, past jobs, duration of employment/work, among related questions.

Tax-Related Questions

To gauge your tax compliance history, USCIS officers will also ask about your tax returns, your filing history, and tax debt of any nature (local, state, or federal government). You are most likely to be eligible for Citizenship if you are a responsible tax-paying citizen.

Ethics Questions

In an effort to gauge your character, you will be asked ethics questions that include but aren't limited to your support for the U.S. government and constitution, your voting history, if you have discriminated against anybody in the past, if you will obey U.S. laws, if you can perform noncombatant duties in the U.S. military or for national good when called upon.

Legal Questions

The USCIS is also interested in your criminal history. For this reason, expect questions such as if you have ever been involved in any rebel or vigilante group activities, past arrests, charges and convictions, and immigration violations. Your likelihood of securing citizenship increase if you don't have a criminal past.

Summary: What are the most asked questions for Citizenship in the U.S.?

While there are many other questions asked when the USCIS is determining whether to reject or accept U.S. citizenship applications, the above questions are the most common. Understanding the basis of these questions and the right answers is critical. However, purpose to be truthful as these questions are asked while you are under Oath.

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